Your Summer Baby Carrier

Ergo Baby Carrier for summer

Windows are open. I notice the occasional warm breeze. It’s time to ask whether you have the right carrier to take advantage of this beautiful weather with your baby or toddler. Do you have your summer baby carrier?

As you are out and about this summer, how active will you be and for how long?


Mei Tai Baby Carriers

If you will just be walking around town or going to the park, a soft mei tai baby carrier gives you a good balance between comfort and support for both you and your baby.

The FreeHand Mei Tai Baby Carrier is soft like traditional Asian baby carriers.

Free Hand baby carrier at bynature.ca

The BabyHawk Mei Tai Carrier has thicker, padded shoulder straps.

BabyHawk baby carrier at bynature.ca

Both of these mei tai carriers get great reviews from our customers.


Soft Pack Buckle Carriers

If you will be hiking and spending a lot of time wearing your baby, a soft-pack buckle baby carrier will give both of you more support.

The Ergo Baby Carrier is our most popular baby carrier—lightweight an very comfortable.

Ergo baby carrier

The Boba Baby Carrier takes the traditional mei tai shape and adds zippered pouches, straps, and buckles to make this adaptable for long periods out.

Boba baby carrier

Ergo always gets great reviews, but none of our customers has reviewed the Boba yet. Be the first!

A comfortable baby carrier that fits your lifestyle makes an active summer with your baby so much easier.

Babywearing Without Stuff

Mother wearing baby in a long fabric wrap baby carrier

You don’t need a lot of stuff to wear your baby. One baby carrier will cover most situations if you choose carefully. Around the world, women wear their babies multi-purpose lengths of fabric or scarves. Babywearing without stuff is not so difficult.

Most of us will probably opt for a commercial carrier for ease or safety, but don’t assume that is your only choice. If you use a length of fabric for your carrier, just be sure that you know how to keep your baby and yourself safe.


Limit the Number of Baby Carriers You Buy

Make sure your carrier or carriers match your actual lifestyle not the one you dream about. I was not a baby hiker, so a sporty Ergo would not have helped me. I did buy that style of carrier, and I didn’t use it. If you aren’t sure yet how you and your baby will travel around and what you will do, get a simple, newborn-friendly carrier to start. Wraps and slings are simple to start. If they keep working for you, you won’t need to add another carrier.


Buy a Neutral-color Baby Carrier

When you are wearing your baby, the carrier becomes part of your wardrobe. If you buy a more neutral color or design, you might not feel so tempted to get one for every outfit.

I owned several slings. Buying for my first child, I was stuck on the tail-end of the era of “all baby products are meant to make the parent look like a baby.” My first sling was an Over the Shoulder Baby Holder in light blue check with huge padded rails. I really came to hate that sling. As soon as I found my black Maya Wrap, I was set for life—then I bought half a dozen more Maya Wraps in various colors. I didn’t need them, though. Black served me well. It matched my wardrobe (as well as my graduation robes!). The revelation to me was that someone realized the parent doesn’t have to wear pastels just because she is carrying a baby. Hallelujah!

Choose a color or style that won’t deter you or your spouse or other caregivers from wearing your baby.


Don’t Get Accessories, Unless You Absolutely Need Them

If you aren’t going out in the sun, you won’t need an ozone cover up. If you are going to be spending a lot of time outside, you’ll probably be glad you invested in the cover up. If you already have plenty of blankets, why invest in a blanket that is only used for your baby carrier? You won’t need most extras, so don’t pre-buy accessories.

Use your simple baby carrier, and ask yourself what is working and what isn’t. Talk face to face with someone who has experience, and show them what you need. If you are near us in Orillia, Ontario, come by our store. We love to help parents solve bearwearing issues. Even if you don’t have someone close enough to help you face to face, call us and we will make sure you get the help you need in finding a carrier (and, sometimes, carriers and accessories) to fit your lifestyle.

Image © Andrey Burkov | Dreamstime.com

Babywearing for Air Travel

Mother with baby in baby carrier

If you are preparing for airport travel over the holidays, consider wearing your baby rather than pushing a stroller. It is much easier to move through a crowd, and your baby will likely be happier up near the faces in the crowd rather than surrounded by a sea of legs.

Very young children might be bothered by the busy-ness and crowds at the airport. Babywearing gives your child a place to tuck into a familiar space and hide against you. Or, for a more adventurous child, babywearing gives your baby a good vantage point to see all of the excitement.


Choose a carrier that is very easy to get on and off.
You may need to remove it at security and carry your baby through in your arms. Some parents find that they are allowed to wear an all-cloth carrier (like a mei tai), but you will certainly have to remove a ring sling because of the metal rings. Be prepared just in case.

Choose a carrier that is comfortable. If you have to stand for a long period of time or if you plan to wear the carrier on a long flight, you will be glad you considered comfort. I wore a ring sling on every flight with a baby, and it was very easy to nurse or get up without too much fuss.

Front carry or back carry? You might find back carry easier as you check in or claim bags, but a front carrier will make it easy to just scoot into your seat if you are flying with your baby on your lap. A baby carrier that makes either easy is a good choice for air travel.

Greet the flight attendant. I think I’ve already told the story of me getting hassled for holding my baby in a sling on my lap on an Air Canada cattle car from Toronto to London. If you are going to have your baby on your lap, my advice is to board early and make sure the flight attendant sees your carrier and knows how you are going to use it. It’s better than having them threaten to turn around because you are a breastfeeding, babywearing threat to the flight. (I got to have a chat with the pilot while I defiantly breastfed. They didn’t turn around.) I understand that most flight attendants are better informed about breastfeeding on a plane now, especially to relieve ear pressure during take off, but just prepare yourself to calmly explain your carrier to avoid an incident.

Image © Sascha Dunkhorst | Dreamstime.com

6 Tips to Help Your Baby through Holiday Time

Mother comforting baby

Holidays are a stimulating, even over-stimulating, time for a baby. Especially if this is your baby’s first holiday season, there is likely to be a lot more going on than usual. Between parties and family, shopping and looking at lights, and other situations full of crowds of strangers, your baby may need a break. Here are a few tips to avoid an over-stimulated baby.

1. Keep Up the Routine
As much as you can, keep the same general structure that your baby is accustomed to. Don’t skip feeding and sleeping times.

2. Carry Familiar Items
If your child has a toy animal or doll that seems to spread calm, bring it. The more unfamiliar the surroundings, the more comforting familiar items and faces will be.

3. Explain What Is Happening
If your child is beginning to talk, the content of what you say might actually be helpful. For a baby who doesn’t yet understand your words, just the periodic sound of your voice will be reassuring.

4. Take Breaks
Before your baby gets anxious, take a break. Sing, talk, sway, or do whatever your baby finds soothing. If you will be in a noisy environment—a New Year’s Eve celebration, for example—build a relatively quiet break time into your plans.

5. Follow Your Baby’s Cues
Follow your baby’s lead. When your child starts pushing and getting restless, it’s time for a break. If you wait, you risk a meltdown, which could be far more uncomfortable for all involved. Just excuse yourself briefly for some rest time, to breastfeed, or just to go into a quiet place and talk face to face.

6. Wear Your Baby
When you wear your baby facing you, it is easy for you to face out talking while the baby turns in when she wants to. She isn’t stuck facing the unfamiliar with no way to make it stop. If she can nuzzle in your neck, she has a positive choice to make when facing out it too much.

Friends meeting your baby for the first time will want to hold and talk, but that during that phase at about 4 to 24 months old, most babies will not want to be passed around. Let this first introduction be at a distance if that is what your baby needs.

Give your child the best chance to be at his best when he meets friends and family for the first time. He won’t care about making an impression, but a lot of eager people really do have a genuine desire to get to know him. Help them both by bridging their expectations and being your baby’s refuge when holiday parties get to be just too much.

Image © Vanessa Van Rensburg | Dreamstime.com

Compare Baby Carriers – Soft Structured

Ergo soft structured baby carrier

Adding a few buckles and snaps to a Mei Tai, with some extra padding and structure, will give you a soft-pack or “buckle” baby carrier. Soft structured baby carriers include the popular Ergo Baby Carrier, a favorite for Dad, as well as the hip-carrying baby carriers that are gaining in popularity for toddlers and older babies. Just because baby is getting bigger, doesn’t mean you have to stop carrying them!

A structured baby carrier evenly distributes the weight of your baby across both shoulders and hips, making it comfortable to carry for long periods of time. Most parents find they can carry a baby, especially a heavy toddler, the longest in a structured carrier. Our best-selling Ergo Baby Carrier can be used with a baby more than 40lbs and the Beco Butterfly II can be worn with a child up to 50lbs.

Because the tiniest babies need more support for head and neck, a structured soft pack carrier is best for an older baby with head control (3 months+).

With their comfort, ease of use and mainstream appeal, it’s easy to see why soft-structured baby carriers are so popular among parents. If you do a great deal of walking or hiking with your baby, this is the baby carrier to choose.

This post is part of a series in which we give an overview of baby carrier styles, comparing the specific baby carriers available within each style. Despite the variety of baby carriers on the market today, nearly all fall into one of four basic styles.


Soft Pack Buckle Carriers


Advantages

  • easy to use
  • ergonomic, so weight is evenly distributed to hips
  • very supportive
  • usually Dad’s favorite
  • high resale value


Disadvantages

  • not usually recommended for newborns who cannot hold their heads up well (3 mo +)
  • does not fold compact for travel or in a diaper bag
  • can be more expensive due to the amount of workmanship required in their manufacturing


Soft Pack Baby Carriers Compared

BabyHawk Oh Snap Baby Carrier

BabyHawk Oh Snap Baby Carrier

Style: Soft Structure Baby Carrier
Age: 15lbs to 45lbs
Carrying Positions: Front (in or out), Back

Beco Butterfly Baby Carrier

Beco Baby Carrier, Beco Butterfly II

Style: Soft Structured Baby Carrier
Age: Suitable for newborn to 50+ lbs
Carrying Positions: Tummy to Tummy, Back Carry
Origin: Made in the USA and China

Beco Gemini Baby Carrier

Gemini Beco Baby Carrier

Style: Soft Structured Carrier
Age: Newborn to 35+ lbs
Carrying Positions: Tummy to Tummy, Back, Hip
Origin: Made in the USA and China

Ergo Baby Carrier

Ergo Baby Carrier also in Sport Style

Style: Soft-Pack Structured Baby Carrier
Age: Suitable for newborn (with infant insert) to 40lbs
Carrying Positions: Front (infant to toddler), Hip, Back (with older baby only)

Ergo Performance Baby Carrier

Ergo Performance Baby Carrier

Style: Soft-Pack Structured Baby Carrier, light and durable for activities
Age: Newborn to toddler
Carrying Positions: Back, Front, and Hip

FreeHand Baby Carrier

FreeHand Baby Carrier

Style: Soft Structured Carrier
Age: Newborn to 35lbs
Carrying Positions: Front (facing in or out), Newborn carry, Back carry

Pikkolo Baby Carrier

Pikkolo Baby Carrier

Style: Hybrid Mei Tai & Soft Structured Carrier (A Mei Tai with Buckles!)
Age: Newborn to 40 lbs
Carrying Positions: Forward Facing In or OUT, Hip & Back Carrying

Scootababy Soft Structured Baby Carrier

Scootababy Hip Baby Carrier

Style: Soft Structured Hip Carrier; a cross between a Mei Tai & a Sling
Age: From head control (approx. 5 months) to 40 lbs (toddler)
Carrying Positions: Tummy to Tummy, Hip/Side, Back (short periods)