Holiday Stories for Solstice and Christmas

Mother reading to a child

As you create holiday traditions with your children, read to them. Read stories that explain each holiday, stories that help your children understand their role in the holiday, stories that explain how your family relates to the holiday. Read stories that spread joy of celebration. And, collect a pile of books you love to read over and over.

This year, knowing that holidays can sometimes creep up on us, I’ve posted holiday stories that you can find online at the last minute—the REAL last-minute when you can’t run out and buy a book.

It’s not too late for solstice today or Christmas next week. Here are a few holiday stories you can find online.

How to Build a Snowman with Your Sister

“How to Build a Snowman with Your Sister” is a short, sweet story of a raccoon boy and his little sister building a snowman. Read the text yourself, and look at the few illustrations. This is part of a collection at TLC (television channel). They have more stories, if you are looking for short, winter stories that aren’t necessarily connected to a holiday.

Lynn Plourde, The Blizzard Wizard

I love that “The Blizzard Wizard” is read aloud by the author in this video. Watch her reading and turning the pages of the book so you can see the illustrations. The story isn’t holiday focused, but it is a simple story of a wizard who makes snow for children who are eager for winter play. 8 minutes long.

Starhawk, A Visit to Mother Winter

“A Visit to Mother Winter” tells the story of two very different sisters who visit Mother Winter. This is one of the stories I read to my children. They are teenagers, but we read it last night for solstice. They still love hearing holiday stories. This is not necessarily a religious solstice story. It could fit into any winter holiday celebration.

If you are looking for a book, I love The Return of the Light: Twelve Tales from Around the World for Winter Solstice. I have this collection.

Twas the Night Before Christmas, read by Santa

This is a fun video of a Santa reading to children the story of Twas the Night Before Christmas. If you don’t have a copy of the book, this is an easy way to fit the story into your Christmas. He doesn’t show the illustrations, but you get to watch the children listening. 4:44 minutes.

My favorite Christmas movies are the Rankin-Bass Christmas Specials, like Rudolf the Red-nosed Reindeer and Frosty the Snowman. Those are available on DVD. If you need a Christmas movie for children quick, you can find the full movie of Winnie the Pooh and Christmas, Too on YouTube. (The books are better, but it’s there if you need it.)

Is your library still open? They might have a few Christmas stories left. Need a list? Check out Buzzfeed for 20 Children’s Christmas Books to Read Aloud. They give you a quick summary of each story AND why you should read it.

Have a bright Solstice, a Merry Christmas, and a beautiful winter holiday season.

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Halloween Stories for Children

Mother tells Halloween story

If you are trying to avoid the candy-focus of so many Halloween celebrations, you will probably want to create your own family traditions that your children will look forward to.

Tell your children stories. Help them see holidays as time to sit and reflect with family

Over time, you might develop your own family stories. Until you get there, I have a few last-minute suggestions for stories.

Our Halloween

For my family, Halloween in our big holiday of the year. It’s our new year. We focus on what is happening in nature as it gets colder outside but the snow hasn’t yet fallen—or hasn’t yet stayed. We rake leaves, jump in them, then rake them again. We draw on our pumpkin—our one pumpkin that grew this year—then we cut it up to make soup.

And, we tell stories. We tell stories about ancestors in the tradition of Day of the Dead, Ghost Festival, Samhain, and All Souls Night. We tell stories about the season. We tell funny stories.

We also have fun dressing up and going to parties with friends, but we reserve a part of the day and night for our family celebration.

Halloween Stories

Tell stories out of your imagination, stories that pull your children in as the adventurous protagonists. My children still love this, and they still tell one another stories. They write stories, comic books, novels, animated tales. They expect to be part of the adventure.

If you aren’t quite ready to make up stories for your children, you could collect stories and books, experimenting to find your favorites.

It’s a bit late to be looking for books for this year, so I’ve gathered a few Halloween stories you can share with your children right now.

For very young children, 2-4 years old. “Little Orange House” is a short, active story that will surprise little kids. I don’t want to give it away, so you’ll have to watch to see the surprise. Nothing scary at all. Watch the video, and look at the collection of other non-scary stories and songs for young children. You will need a couple of simple props to tell this story to your children.

For young children, 5-7 years old. “The Witch Who Was Frightened of Halloween” is an audio story, 9 minutes long, about Katie, an ordinary little girl who happens to be a witch. You can read or listen to this story.

For older children, age varies. If you want to venture into more scary stories, how about choosing old stories and folktales. American Folklore has a dozen spooky but not quite turn-your-hair-white frightening stories for children. These aren’t the sweet, predictable stories often written for young children. These are stories collected by folklorists from old tellers of tales. If you need more horror or fright, look for their “Scary Stories” and “Supernatural Stories.” You can either read or listen to these stories.

It’s Your Halloween!

To create the holiday you want your children to have, it only takes a little preparation and a little time to bring the focus where you want it to be for your family: nature, the season, celebration, fun, and maybe a little bit of scary screaming. Happy Halloween.

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Thanksgiving Stories with Children

Dad reading to children

If you are gathering with family this weekend to celebrate Thanksgiving, giving thanks for the year’s harvest, we wish you the best.

In those quiet moments, you might want to share stories of thanksgiving with your children. I find that my children become more aware of themselves and their surroundings when faced with a cultural or historical contrasts. Both of these stories will help bring up such contrasts.

A Pioneer Thanksgiving

Barabara Greenwood, A Pioneer Thanksgiving: A Story of Harvest Celebrations in 1841 (Kids Can Press: 1999).

This story of a Canadian pioneer family, the Robertsons, combines their preparations for their harvest festival with activities and historical information for children.

Goodreads gives you many sources for A Pioneer ThanksgivingYou can also get a better look on Google Books

Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address

Thanksgiving Address: Greetings to the Natural World (Six Nations Museum: 1993).

This traditional address of thanksgiving for Haudensosaunee (Iroquois) acknowledges the ever-widening circles of concern, beginning with the People then the Earth and so on. Each section of the address is punctuated with a version of “Now our minds are one.”

This version of the address in English is available through the Smithsonian Institution Museum of the American Indian. This is a contemporary address still given among Haudeosaunee (Six Nations).

How can we teach our children to be thankful? I share how I have tried to model thanks with my family in “Raising Thankful Children.”

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